Category: Tank Inspections


Clean Water Logo 4.jpg

Our new logo designed by Ryan Bijan. The background photo is a west Texas sunset taken by Bradly Perrin several years ago on the way to a tank inspection or cleaning job. I always liked the photo but had no idea it would eventually become part of a logo like this. At first glance I just liked the color and design. But upon deeper reflection it really has depth and shows what our organization is all about. Our infrastructure is in trouble. Billions of dollars need to be spent in all areas. The nations water storage tanks are only a part of the infrastructure but the sun is truly setting on many of them that have been standing tall for 40, 80, 100 years or more. The sunset background is reflecting the heat of a hot summer day. Heat is another factor, more heat year after year heat records are being broken. Bacteria, protozoa, viruses and other contaminants thrive in heat. Far too many older tanks go year after year without being properly cleaned. That mixed with he lack of funds to repair and replace infrastructure like water towers along with more and more heat is a recipe for disaster. I hope the logo will spark some interest in our project. Our Mission us to educate elected officials and utility managers of the dangers of going year after year without proper inspection and cleaning of water storage tanks and towers.

Monday, July 03, 2017- ABC 7 Chicago News reported that Louisiana health officials confirmed the presence of Naegleria fowleri, commonly known as the brain-eating amoeba, in Ouachita Parish’s North Monroe water system and Terrebonne Parish’s Schriever water system in Louisiana during routine testing. Officials reassured residents that drinking tap water is still safe and that taking precautions in pools and showers can reduce their risk of infection.

The Louisiana Department of Health said it notified public health officials and the administrators of the water systems on Thursday June 29, 2017. The health department urged residents to avoid getting water in their noses, which is how the organism can infect the brain. The department also advised the public to run baths, shower taps and hoses for at least five minutes before use to flush the pipes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Naegleria fowleri can cause primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a brain infection that is almost always fatal. People are particularly at risk for contracting PAM if the amoebas enter through the nose, which can happen when people swim or dive in freshwater contaminated with Naegleria fowleri. In the early stages of PAM, symptoms may be similar to those of bacterial meningitis: a severe headache, fever, nausea and vomiting. Late-stage symptoms include seizures, hallucinations and coma.The Louisiana Department of Health has tested for Naegleria fowleri since 2013, with officials sampling public drinking water systems each summer when temperatures rise. Officials have collected 540 samples to test for this amoeba since 2013. The health department ordered the water systems to switch to the free chlorine disinfection method for 60 days to ensure that any remaining amoebas in the systems are eliminated.

Unfortunately switching to free chlorine is only a bandaid on a larger problem that is not going away any time soon.

Removing sediment from the interior floor of the tank is the only way you can be sure to get rid of this type of contaminant. Many think a “Chlorine Burn” is the answer. Wrong. The “Burn” only works if the tank is clean.

If there is sediment on the floor of the contaminated tank the intruder will still be there under the sediment and grow again after the additional chlorine is gone. The AWWA recommends tanks be cleaned every 3 to 5 years. Still some are never cleaned.

Photo #3 Potable Water Tank Cleaning with Diver (c) Ron Perrin.com 

Why? How much of a reason do you need?

Keeping your tanks clean may prevent you from collecting a wide range of bacteria, protozoa, viruses and even amoebas like this. These microbes use the sediment on the floor of a dirty tank as a habitat to grow, deplete your chlorine reserves and become a real threat to public health.

All public water systems should clean all storage tanks and towers at least every five years. A potable water dive crew is one way to remove the sediment with minimal water loss and usually no disruption in service. After the sediment has been removed chemical treatments are many times more effective.

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Photos: 

#1 File Photo Potable Water Tank Cleaning with Diver (c) Ron Perrin.com 

#2 CDC- Naegleria fowleri (commonly referred to as the “brain-eating amoeba”)

#3  File Photo Potable Water Diver (c) Ron Perrin.com 

File Photo Potable Water Tank Cleaning with Diver (c) Ron Perrin.com 

Why do some utilities NOT clean their water tanks and towers? On the Missouri Department of Natural Resources Water Protection Program fact sheet they state: “Routine inspection, cleaning and maintenance of finished water storage facilities are clearly necessary to protect public health.” Isn’t that just common sense? Some states do not have rules on when you inspect or clean tanks. Water storage tanks and towers are the last stop water makes before it comes to the tap at your home. These tanks need to be inspected inside and out every year. We have been using underwater cameras to get that done since 1997. If our cameras find sediment build-up we can remove it with a potable water dive team. Our services are efficient and affordable but still many communities choose to do nothing at all. Check this video out and let us know what you think.

 

Source: Missouri has no requirement to clean water towers

Source: Missouri has no requirement to clean water towers

A report released this week stated 193 water systems were in violation of federal safe drinking-water regulations. Almost half were in Kansas, Texas and Puerto Rico.

The report points out that small water systems violate safe drinking-water standards more often than large ones and are less likely, “to have the technical capacity required to properly monitor their water for contaminants, make timely repairs or replace faulty materials.”

SEE KCEN NEWS STORY

If you manage a small water system hire a professional contractor to perform an annual storage tank inspection. Know what is going on inside the tanks. If your tanks have never been cleaned it may be a better idea to clean them before doing a inspection. 

In our business we see tanks every week that have never been cleaned.

The basic housekeeping of cleaning water storage tanks removes contaminants from the drinking-water distribution systems. After we clean tanks our customers consistently tell us they use less chlorine. Chlorine simply works better in a clean tank, it produces less byproducts and it allows you to meet safe drinking-water regulations more easily.

Currently the EPA has no rules requiring tanks to be inspected or cleaned.

If you think the EPA should require water storage tanks to be inspected or cleaned please scroll down and take the poll on this page!

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Photo:  Sediment being removed from the floor of a water storage tank.

 

Once your hearing is gone, it’s gone. What are you doing to protect your hearing in the workplace?

Source: Municipal Sewer & Water Magazine | Say What? It’s National Protect Your Hearing Month

WORMS IN TAP WATER!
Worms are ok in water if you’re fishing, but Thursday morning, the 30th of July, I woke to see a news story about worms in drinking water. I live in Fort Worth but the story was getting wide coverage from CBS Houston. I had to know more about this! I went to work and told Ryan, our director of media & video production, to pack a bag because we were headed to Houston. We went to the heart of the story, Woodland Acres, which is a subdivision in Old River-Winfree about 25 miles east of Baytown, Texas, to see the worms for ourselves. We met several residents who were still had worms coming out of their tap water. Read more on our new page www.WORMSINDRINKINGWATER.COM

November 7th, 2014, Ginger Allen and the CBS 11 i-Team watches as my company inspects and cleans a north Texas water tower. The tower was cleaned as a normal maintenance procedure. A light- brown dusting of sediment was removed from the interior floor before it could get deep enough to support bacteria and become a problem.  

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The tower was cleaned by a Commercial Diver who was trained at OCEAN CORP, Houston, Texas. The Diver is sealed in his own environment, then washed down with a chlorine solution. Because we specialize in the inspection and cleaning of Potable Water Storage Facilities, all of our equipment is purchased for, and only used in, potable water.

This utility is doing a great job of maintaining their system. However, utility managers across the country struggle to get the funds to properly maintain their systems. The EPA is currently considering a regulation that would require all water storage facilities to be inspected and cleaned at regular intervals. This new requirement could improve the water quality for millions of Americans.

Ron Perrin Speaks to I-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

The EPA is taking comments on this proposed regulation until the end of the year. We have the contact information posted on our blog, or you can just take our poll at: www.cleanwatertankproject.com. The poll results will be turned in to the EPA at the end of the year.

Sediment being removed

See Video Here:  http://launch.newsinc.com/?type=VideoPlayer/Single&widgetId=1&trackingGroup=69016&siteSection=houstonchronstudio_hom_non_sec&videoId=28175822” target=”_blank”>CLICK HERE

http://launch.newsinc.com/?type=VideoPlayer/Single&widgetId=1&trackingGroup=69016&siteSection=houstonchronstudio_hom_non_sec&videoId=28175822” target=”_blank”>http://launch.newsinc.com/?type=VideoPlayer/Single&widgetId=1&trackingGroup=69016&siteSection=houstonchronstudio_hom_non_sec&videoId=28175822

http://launch.newsinc.com/?type=VideoPlayer/Single&widgetId=1&trackingGroup=69016&siteSection=houstonchronstudio_hom_non_sec&videoId=28175822” target=”_blank”> 
See the full Story HERE:

http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2014/11/19/water-towers/http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2014/11/19/water-towers/

The EPA is considering requiring ALL POTABLE WATER STORAGE TANKS in the U.S.A. TO BE INSPECTED AND CLEANED.

Ron Perrin Water Technologies Owner

Ron Perrin in Washington D.C. on 10-14-14 to attend EPA meeting

Washington D.C. 10-14-14

Washington D.C. 10-14-14

 

On October 15th 2014, the EPA held a public meeting in regards to Distribution System Storage Facility Inspection and Cleaning. I attended that meeting in person to express my opinion on this issue. During the meeting a couple of surprising things were revealed. Many were under the impression that water tanks and towers were already being inspected during Sanitary Surveys performed by state regulators, when in fact most, if not all, state agencies do not allow their employees to climb to the top of water tanks and towers.  The few states that climbed the towers in the past did not do an internal inspection of the facility.


A survey had been sent to state regulators to get their opinion on this issue. About half thought a regulation would be a good idea, the other half thought a paper on guidance would be sufficient. I went away from the meeting more convinced than ever that there should be a national regulation requiring all potable water storage tanks to be inspected and cleaned on a regular schedule.


The webinar is over but the EPA is still taking comments until the end of 2014. If you would like to make a comment on this issue, please send an e-mail to:  SFIWebinar@cadmusgroup.com.  Or take the poll below and I will send in the results at the end of the year. This is a chance to let your opinion be known!

My customers tell me they need less chlorine to meet water quality standards after I remove the sediment from their water storage tanks and towers. Sediment enters the tank one particle at a time and eventually accumulates enough for bacteria, protozoa and even viruses to use it as a habitat to grow and become a serious health problem. If proper inspections are not done to determine sediment levels, corrective action is seldom, if ever, taken. My opinion is that potable water storage facilities should be inspected inside and out every year, and a cleaning program to ensure tanks and towers are cleaned every 3 to 5 years should be in place on all tanks. What do you think? Take THE POLL BELOW and also visit http://www.tankdiver.us.

10-14-14 Washington D.C. Mall

10-14-14 Washington D.C. Mall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is important!  Please SHARE OUR POLL!

 

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Topic: Distribution System Storage Facility Inspection and Cleaning

Background: The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water announces a public meeting and webinar on distribution system storage facility inspection and cleaning. The purpose of the meeting and webinar is to gather input and information from the public and stakeholders on the appropriate frequency of distribution system water storage facility inspection and cleaning, current practices, and the risk management approaches that can be taken to assure that inspection, cleaning and corrective action occur as necessary to help maintain facility integrity and finished water quality. The presenters and panelists will provide background information concerning storage facility inspection and cleaning, existing state programs and available guidance documents. For additional background information, please refer to the Federal Register notice published on Thursday, September 4, 2014 (79 FR 52647).

Public Comments: This meeting is open to the public. EPA encourages public input and will allocate time on the agenda for public comment. To ensure adequate time for public involvement, individuals or organizations interested in making a statement should mention their interest when they register. All presentation materials and statements should be emailed to SFIWebinar@cadmusgroup.com by October 8, 2014, so that the information can be incorporated into the webinar as appropriate. Only one person should present a statement on behalf of a group or organization, and statements will be limited to five minutes. Availability to make public comments will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis in the time available. Additional comments from attendees who did not pre-register to make comments will be taken if time permits. Comments, written statements, data or information can also be sent to SFIWebinar@cadmusgroup.com after the public meeting and webinar.

 

  1. Background

In the Federal Register notice for the proposed Revisions to the Total Coliform Rule (75 FR

40926, July 14, 2010), the EPA requested comment on the value and cost of periodic distribution

system storage tank inspection and cleaning. The EPA received comments regarding unsanitary

conditions and contamination that can be found in storage facilities, which are not routinely

inspected and cleaned, including breaches and accumulation of sediment, animals, insects and

other contaminants. Some commenters suggested the need for a Federal regulation requiring

systematic inspection and cleaning because the existing practices are not successful in all cases.

Others suggested that regular sanitary surveys conducted by States and the adherence to existing

industry guidance could resolve such issues. The comments can be reviewed in the docket for the

rule at http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=EPA-HQ-OW-2008-0878-0283. This

meeting and webinar and the subsequent opportunity to submit comments are intended to collect

more data and information about the frequency of distribution system water storage facility

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inspection and cleaning and the need for more or better risk management approaches.

Dated: August 25, 2014.

Eric Burneson,

Acting Director,

Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water.

BILLING CODE 6560-50-P

[FR Doc. 2014-21073 Filed 09/03/2014 at 8:45 am; Publication Date: 09/04/2014]

Shreveport Times reports that positive results for Naegleria fowleri were found in Ebarb, Louisiana. The positive results were in the system’s lines in the Aimwell area, which serves 5,529 people. Reported by
Vickie Welborn, September 12, 2014.

EBARB – The Ebarb Water System has tested positive for the brain-eating amoeba, according to state health officials. The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals said the infected water was sampled in August as part of its surveillance program. DHH learned the Ebarb system was not in compliance with the state’s emergency rule, which requires water systems to maintain a minimum disinfectant residual level of 0.5 milligrams per liter throughout all of their distribution lines. That level is known to control Naegleria fowleri.
The positive results were in the system’s lines in the Aimwell area, which serves 5,529 people. There have been no reports of illnesses in Sabine Parish as a result of the amoeba’s presence, DHH states.
Read the Article Here- http://www.shreveporttimes.com/story

Sediment in the floor of water storage tanks has been proven to be a habitat that can support contaminants allowing them to hide from treatment chemicals. Keeping Water Storage Tanks clean is an important part of keeping water systems safe!

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